Dress design draping and flat pattern making pdf

 

    Dress Design: Draping and Flat Pattern Making [Marion S. Hillhouse, Evelyn A. Mansfield] on tirucamilo.ga *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The purpose of . Apr 30, Dress Design Draping - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read book DRAPING A N D FLAT P A T T E R N M A K I N G. Jun 4, This week she uploaded Dress Design Draping and Flat Pattern Making by Marion S. Hillhouse and Evelyn A. Mansfield. This book (

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    Dress Design Draping And Flat Pattern Making Pdf

    Friday Freebie: Dress Design Draping and Flat Pattern Making. Drafting the pattern for a draped suit front and back. Pattern Making BooksPattern. Dress Design, Draping and Flat Pattern Making, Marion Strong Hillhouse, Evelyn A. tirucamilo.ga Sep 1, Dress design, draping and flat pattern making [by] Marion S. Hillhouse [and] Evelyn A. Mansfield by Marion Strong Hillhouse, , Houghton.

    Pattern making is quite interesting and important for a student and it helps the people of any age groups to interpret the designs and understand the design with technical ability. There are three different types to prepare a pattern i. Drafting, Draping and Flat paper pattern making. Drafting involves measurement derived from sizing systems or accurate measurements taken on a person, dress or body form. Measurements for different body parts is taken i. Nape to neck to waist, waist, neck and hip circumference, Armscye depth, shoulder to bust, bust point to bust point and so on, and seam allowances are marked on pattern, construction lines are marked to finish the pattern. It is done on brown paper and helps to create basic patterns; foundation of new designs can be easily made. Draping involves of two or three dimensional piece of muslin fabric around a form. It is a very creative method of making a pattern which also saves time and the design can be checked on the dummies itself. Secondly, the measurements can be adjusted accordingly. This is a simplest method in which sloper is made and used for many design variations. Ret-a-Porter market widely uses this method as it is more accurate and fast.

    The book starts by covering such basics as the effect of fabric type and weight on the drape of finished garments and the effect of print and pattern on style lines.

    Dress Design Draping

    It then takes the reader through padding and setting up a dress form based off of personalised draped bodice and skirt patterns and then gets stuck into the actual pattern modifications part. These patterns are also manipulated to achieve effects such as seamed style lines, gathers, drapes and other advanced modifications for the bodice, skirt, sleeves, collars and peplum, creating fabulously feminine variations. Flat pattern modification on the bodice to achieve a gathered bolero effect attached at the centre back collar.

    Modifying a kimono sleeved bodice for a yoked front with gathered detail. Collar a would make a cool snap-on accessory.. For extra deadliness, just add pearls. I quite like this Grecian style.

    Read ahead to draft a vertical styleline and add flare to it. Refer to photo [A] for steps 3 and 4.

    Adjust the base of the flared styleline to match [B]. The straight of grain will be more structured and seams will really hold the flare. The bias will add soft fullness all the way around the base. Follow the cutting instructions from step 6 of the Stylelines section, shown here. TIP Try this on any vertical styleline, from pants to sleeves.

    Pencil A pencil silhouette is very simple to draft. It creates a pegged hemline. How much you peg or taper your hemline is dependent on the length of your skirt and your ability to walk! Measure the new base front and back, and then multiply by 2. Wrap a tape measure to that measurement and hold it around your legs at the hem length and see how it feels.

    Continue to add stylelines if desired [B]. See Hem Finishes for instructions on how to draft a hem for a skirt with a tapered base. Stylelines There are endless variations of stylelines. They can be used for shaping in place of darts so they can really shape around the contours of your body.

    They can be symmetrical or asymmetrical, and so much more. TIP Create an asymmetric design by tracing your skirt master as a full front. Copy both the right and left side of your master pattern front or back. Mark notches across the styleline, making sure their position is unique, so that they are helpful when sewing.

    Your stylelines do not need to pass directly through the darts, but the closer they are to the original dart position, the better the fit will be [A]. Draw a new dart leg to one side of the styleline [B].

    An adjustment to the dart leg length may need to be made; do this at the waistline [C]. The examples shown are as follows. See Flare Extension. Gathers One might think of a gathered skirt simply as a rectangle sewn into a waistband. I encourage you to give them more credit. Gathered skirts can be very full and gathered around the entire waist, or you can choose to just gather small sections of your skirt, creating light or full volume in very specific places.

    Depending on the fabric you choose, the gathering can add dramatically different amounts of volume. As you did in the flare exercise, you will be creating insertion lines, only this time you will add volume at the waist. Typically, the dart is absorbed into the gathers and can mostly be ignored. TIPS See how gathering creates volume in a specific fabric by testing it and adjust your patterns insertions accordingly.

    Combine the gathers with a flare technique for a hem with a larger sweep. If you want a fully gathered skirt, you can position multiple insertion lines on the front and back. If gathering only in small sections of the skirt is desired, place one or a few insertion lines in a specific area. TIP If you plan to gather near your dart take-up, just ignore the dart.

    Measure and note the space between notches before making insertions. This is the space the gathers will be sewn to. Gathering takes up more space in a heavyweight fabric than in a lighter weight fabric. If you are gathering a skirt to a styleline or waistband, you can place the notches across the styleline or waistband. TIPS If you have inserted more than 3" 7. Insertion amounts can vary; use more notches to indicate a different distribution of gathers.

    To keep your work manageable, cut the insertion lines one at a time. Less insertion is needed for a heavyweight fabric and more insertion for a lightweight fabric [C]. Refer to photo [E] for steps 9 and Add volume only at the waist, not at the hem.

    Pleats There are several kinds of pleats and, for the most part, they are drafted the same way. If pleats are formed on stylelines or insertion lines, they will behave the best if the lines are placed on the length grain or cross grain. They become unstable and unstructured when placed off-grain. Depending on your fabric and construction, pleats can take on many different appearances. An unpressed pleat will add soft volume that billows slightly at the hem, whereas a fabric with crisply pressed or edgestitched pleats will be much more angular and geometric in appearance.

    Be sure to test your fabric to find out what will work best, because your fabric will often tell you. A fabric that loves to be pressed will hold crisp pleats longer. TIP Pleats can be secured only at the waist or sewn down a certain depth from the waist.

    Pleat Types The differences in pleat types come from the way the fabric is folded and how much pleat volume is inserted into your pattern. Knife pleats are generally placed every 1 inch 2. A box pleat can be 3 inches 7. TIPS Remember that your center front is cut on the fold, so if you are inserting many pleats equidistant to each other, the insertion line closest to the center front should be half the distance of the other pleats. Alternatively, if the pleat is on the center front you can extend paper beyond the center front guideline for the pleat.

    Make any changes to the waistline or waist finish.

    If you have many pleat insertions, number them so that you can put it back together in the correct order [A]. TIP If you have inserted more than 3" 7. For a knife pleat, insert 2" 5 cm , fold one side of the insertion line, and place the folded paper on top of the other side of the insertion line. For a box pleat, insert four times the finished pleat size and fold each side of your pleat to the center of the insertion. Adjust the insertion size if the pleat is too small or too large.

    TIP Place a pleat on a vertical styleline by inserting paper between the two pattern pieces. TIP If your dart is in the way, it can be absorbed to one or both sides of the pleat.

    Make sure your notch includes dart take-up. Unfold and draw the traced shape [D]. The Master Bodice Pattern Library Bodice Variations From one type of master you can create any other master, but over time you may find you want your master pattern library to have one of each type in a sleeve and sleeveless version.

    The bodice and skirt combination style has a waistline seam. This is the most direct adaptation of a fitting shell. This option allows for body-conscious to relaxed designs of any length.

    The princess seamline conversion has vertical stylelines or princess seamlines. Making a master pattern in this style eliminates the need for a waistline seam. You can adapt your fitting shell to create a princess seamline conversion or start from a princess seamline commercial pattern. This option also allows for body-conscious to relaxed designs of any length. The relaxed bodice will likely have side darts and may have waist darts.

    It lacks a waistline and vertical seams that are used for shaping. This master is not appropriate for fitted designs, but it is great for creating garments like shift dresses or buttondown shirts and can be designed to any length. This can be created from a princess seamline conversion or bodice and skirt combination. Each of these masters can be made into a sleeveless garment or one with sleeves. Guidelines Regardless of which bodice master you begin working with, have all your guidelines drawn on your master and know how much ease is built into the pattern on each guideline.

    See here.

    Bodice and skirt combination Princess seamline conversion Relaxed bodice Aligning the Master Bodice and Skirt Combination On a fitting shell or other foundation pattern with a waistline seam, make sure that the waist measurement, waist dart take-up, and waist dart location match up across the waistline seam.

    This will make it much easier to convert this pattern to other master pattern styles as well as princess seamline and empire styleline designs. There are two options below for aligning your bodice and skirt pattern: 1 shave off the excess dart take-up and 2 redistribute the dart take-up.

    Shave off the dart take-up if your bust is less full, a B cup or less, or if you prefer a silhouette that is less fitted under the bust. Shave Off the Dart Take-Up 1 Position the center front of the skirt master pattern so that the center front guidelines are aligned.

    Connect the waistline of the skirt and bodice master patterns at the side seams. Tape at the center front guideline to secure [A]. Shave the remaining dart take-up off the side seam, blending to the bust guideline [B].

    Make the dart center perpendicular to the hip-level guideline [C].

    The Vintage Pattern Files: 's Sewing - Dress Design Draping and Flat Pattern Making

    Redistribute the dart take-up if you have a fuller bust, C cup or larger, and you want shaping under the bust in your garment designs. Before beginning with either method, the waist of the bodice and skirt must be equal to each other, excluding the dart takeup. If they are not equal in measurement, choose the bodice measurement.

    The bodice often has more ease built in at the waistline, allowing for more comfort in a dress or blouse design. Redistribute the Dart Take-Up 1 Position the center front of the skirt master pattern so that the center front guidelines are aligned. Make the dart center perpendicular to the hip-level guideline [F]. Creating a Master Princess Seamline If you already have a great jacket or dress pattern with princess seamlines but you want to have more design freedom, you can turn the pattern pieces into a master.

    Use the center front and not a button extension line [A]. Draw a line perpendicular to the center front guideline passing through the waist guideline on your pattern piece [B]. Refer to photo [C] for steps 3 and 4.

    Position the waist guideline of the side front pattern piece on the drawn waist guideline. Mark this connection with an awl punch.

    What is Fashion Draping?

    This will be the center of a waist dart [E]. Refer to photo [F] for steps 7 and 8. Half of this measurement goes to each side of the centerline of the dart.

    Refer to photo [G] for steps 9 and Draw a line perpendicular to the grainline passing through the waist guideline on your pattern piece.

    Position the waist guideline of the side back pattern piece on the drawn waist guideline. Edit 13 December, I was alerted today that the copyright for this book may have been renewed so I have taken down the link. My aim with this book as with all of my scans was to make the knowledge available to everyone that needs it, free of charge. I understand that not everyone has access to the kinds of libraries that stock these books and very few people can afford to download one, so I help where I can.

    Concerned with matters relating to copyright? I began the year with high hopes on learning drafting and grading as ways to complement my sewing skillset, stave off boredom and just learn something new.

    Lacking the time to do that-I focused instead on processing and uploading this vintage gem. Marking the point for a gusset, effect of inserted gusset on final fit. Incorporating seaming into style-lines on the flat pattern. The book starts by covering such basics as the effect of fabric type and weight on the drape of finished garments and the effect of print and pattern on style lines.

    It then takes the reader through padding and setting up a dress form based off of personalised draped bodice and skirt patterns and then gets stuck into the actual pattern modifications part. These patterns are also manipulated to achieve effects such as seamed style lines, gathers, drapes and other advanced modifications for the bodice, skirt, sleeves, collars and peplum, creating fabulously feminine variations.

    Flat pattern modification on the bodice to achieve a gathered bolero effect attached at the centre back collar.

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